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WCWP 10B: The Writing Course B 

Warren students during class.

WCWP 10B is the second half of the Warren Writing sequence. Structured similarly to WCWP 10A, WCWP 10B builds on the argumentation and source-based critical writing of WCWP 10A, adding new perspectives of social justice and research-driven multimodal communication. Students will learn to analyze the dominant worldviews that shape how we think, communicate, and see the world. By the end of the course, students will learn to communicate more effectively with a variety of audiences, and to think about how they can play a role in solving some of the most challenging inequities in our society.

Every section of WCWP 10B engages with a specific topic, and there are a variety of topics offered throughout the academic year. Each topic has the same goals and objectives, but uses different content to engage with issues of justice and ethics central to creating a better world for everyone.

Spring 2024 Topics

"Ways of Seeing" Professor Tricia Ornelas

"From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education" Professor Jeff Gagnon & Simar Sharma, Tharun Suresh, Ganesh Swaminathan

"Climate Justice and Why it Matters" Professor Simrita Dhir

"Trash, or The Lifecycle of Stuff" Professor Walter Merryman

"Communicating Climate Justice" Danielle Groper, Erick Calderon, and Julia Hagedorn

See below for more information about each course topic.

Spring 2024 Class Schedule

WCWP 10B Spring 2024 Schedule
Section Day Time Room Instructor Course Title
001 MW 800-920 EBU3B 1124 Tricia Ornelas Ways of Seeing
002 MW 930-1050 EBU3B 1124 Tricia Ornelas Ways of Seeing 
003 MW 1100-1220 EBU3B 1124 Jeff Gagnon From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education
018 MW 1100-1220 EBU3B 1113 Danielle Groper

Communicating Climate Justice 

004 MW 1230-150 EBU3B 1124 Tricia Ornelas Ways of Seeing
005 MW 1230-150 WSAC 138 Julia Communicating Climate Justice 
006 MW 200-320 EBU3B 1124 TBA From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education
007 MW 330-450 EBU3B 1124 Tharun Suresh From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education
011 TTh 800-920 WSAC 138 Simrita Dhir Climate Justice and Why it Matters
012 TTh 930-1050 WSAC 138 Simrita Dhir Climate Justice and Why it Matters
013 TTh 1100-1220 WSAC 138 Walter Merryman Trash, or The Lifecycle of Stuff
017 TTH 1100-1220 EBU3B 1124 Erick Calderon Communicating Climate Justice 
014 TTh 1230-150 WSAC 138 Simrita Dhir Climate Justice and Why it Matters
023 TTh 1230-150 EBU3B 1113 Ganesh Swaminathan From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education
015 TTH 200-320 WSAC 138 Walter Merryman Trash, or The Lifecycle of Stuff
016 TTH 330-450 WSAC 138 Walter Merryman Trash, or The Lifecycle of Stuff

 

Spring 2024 Course Descriptions

Ways of Seeing

Professor Tricia Ornelas

Sections: 001, 002, 004

What informs our ways of seeing? We intensely occupy several visual worlds today and don't often stop to consider the politics that underlie these worlds. In this writing course, you will look deeply at a visual world within your field of study or interest to discover what informs your way of seeing and what ethical issues are at play. Our course content is inspired by visual politics and student interest to celebrate the valuable knowledge and life experience each student already possesses. Additionally, problem-driven original research will offer access to a scholarly conversation you are genuinely interested in joining.

From the Classroom to the Community: Science Ethics & Education

Professor Jeff Gagnon

Simar Sharma, Tharun Suresh, and Ganesh Swaminathan

Sections: 003, 006, 007, 023

Students majoring in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) require extensive training in technical knowledge and scientific skills. This training serves them well, especially when it comes to the job market after graduation. However, students working in artificial intelligence, big data, environmental engineering, and a host of other fields may someday work with products and problems that directly impact the health and safety of people and communities.
This tension raises important questions for this writing and research course. Should schools and universities train tomorrow's computer scientists and engineers to design, build and code for the public? Do colleges and universities have a responsibility to make STEM education more accessible and inclusive? And in an age of disinformation, should scientists and engineers learn how to communicate complex scientific and technical ideas to the public?

Climate Justice and Why it Matters

Professor Simrita Dhir

Sections: 011, 012, 014

The world’s wealthiest one billion people are responsible for over 50% of the climate pollution, but it will be the bottom three billion, the most politically and economically vulnerable populations of the world, who will suffer the gravest consequences to climate change. Is it fair? In this writing course, students will think critically, read, and write about climate change and its impacts on the most politically and economically vulnerable populations of the world, to redress climate injustice.

Trash, or The Lifecycle of Stuff

Professor Walter Merryman

Sections: 013, 015, 016

Why do we make so much trash? And what should we be doing with it? This class will investigate the cultural practices and values that produce trash, and, importantly, make the disposal of trash seem necessary. Beyond that, we will problematize our trash storage and disposal, consider the effects of a consumerist “throwaway culture,” and propose ways forward that align with an ethics of sustainability, environmental justice, and globally connected citizens.

Communicating Climate Justice

Danielle Groper, Erick Calderon, and Julia Hagedorn

Sections: 005, 017, 018

The climate crisis is real, and the impacts of climate disruption are already being felt here in San Diego and across California. However, those impacts are not being distributed equally. Furthermore, according to recent studies, only 43% of Californians talk about the climate crisis with others on a regular basis. In other words, the problem is big. It is real. We need solutions. And we need hope. But we don't know how to talk or write in ways that spur action or inspire hope. So, what should we do?
For students interested in the intersections of environmental science, justice and communication, this 10B is for you. Our course explores these topics and tensions by asking big questions. How will the climate crisis impact people we love and care about in our local communities? What solutions are most needed in our cities and towns? How should we teach about the solutions in our local schools? In our favorite majors and classes? And how can we communicate to inspire action, change, hope in the face of challenge?

Registration Information and Prerequisites

WCWP 10B is a 4-unit course, and can only be taken for a letter grade. Enrollment in WCWP 10B is open only to Warren College students who have already successfully completed WCWP 10A. As the PHIL/POLY series depends on completion of WCWP 10B, we recommend students complete WCWP 10B in a timely manner.